Taking the Leap: Changing your Career in Mid-Life

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Any decision relation to work always will always be one of utmost importance as it can impact upon all areas of your life. Making the decision to change the area in which you work can be a huge leap of faith, but we seek to offer you some top tips to ensure you can make it benefit you as much as possible.

Do your research

Don’t take the leap blindly. Ensure that you read up on your chosen area(s) and take all the pros and cons into account. If you know someone who already works in the field you have an interest in, make time to take them for a coffee and discuss their opinions and any advice they may offer.

Get the qualifications

Whether it’s UK anthropology degrees or first aid courses, manual handling training or forest school leadership, do a thorough search to see what is out there to suit your needs. If you did your research, as advised in the previous top tip, you should now know what qualifications and training are necessary for your new chosen field. Undertaking a degree can be costly, especially if you have dependants and perhaps a mortgage to pay. Consider part time degree courses or speak to the university to find out how many taught hours there will be per week; it will most likely to possible to combine study with a part time job, which will certainly help your financial situation. They can also affect your family life, so make sure to stay ahead with your studies if this is the route you decide to take.

Changing your Career in Mid-Life anthropology

Consider what’s best for you

By the time we are in our prime, we have often become accustomed to putting the needs of others before our own, resigning ourselves to bottom on our own list of priorities. It’s vital to stop doing this and put yourself first for a change. Of course, if your career change will have an overall negative impact on your family life or cause strains within your relationships, these are factors to weigh up, but ultimately, it’s probably about time you put yourself first.

Take the leap…

When you are ready (and whether it takes you a few weeks or a couple of years, you’ll get there eventually), you can begin your job search. If you are well-connected within the area you’re hoping to branch out into (if you’re not, try pinging off a few emails to companies you like the sound of), it might be worth doing a few days or weeks shadowing someone who has a role you could see yourself doing. This could open doors for your future. Ensure you take the lack of payment into consideration before offering to do this. Although it is great to show willing, it is vital you don’t put your finances at risk by doing so.

Whether you’re moving from teaching into carpentry or from dental hygiene into social media, it’s not an easy leap to take. Be bold and go for it!

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