Yorkshire Wildlife Photographer Simon Roy – Gallery

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Red Grouse in Heather

Yorkshire Wildlife Photographer, Simon Roy

Up-close studies of wildlife at its breathtaking best

Q. Tell us how you started in photography – was it a career, a hobby, at school, or something else?
I’ve always been a creative person and have a degree in art and design. I worked as a Graphic Designer for ten years before redundancy, six years ago, forced a change in direction. I’d enjoyed photography as a hobby for many years and used a film camera before making the jump to digital in 2008. I began photographing wildlife in 2011.

Q. What particularly appeals to you about the genre?
My passion for wildlife began during childhood when I spent many hours observing and identifying the various bird species in a large hawthorn hedge outside my bedroom window. This interest continued into my adult life on walking trips and to nature reserves with my binoculars, spotting scope and a little notebook to record my sightings. I suppose wildlife photography allows me to express both my creativity and my love of the natural world and I hope this shows in my imagery.

Q. How do you go about looking for your images – do you research or is it more ‘spur of the moment’?
When I first started shooting wildlife it was spur of the moment but now most of my photographs are planned and thoughtfully executed. This is often the result of research leading to a greater understanding of my subject and its behaviour. I try to imagine how the final image will look and use the rules of composition to position elements within the frame.

Many hours of patience and perseverance

Q. What is the most challenging part of being a photographer/taking good images?
In the modern world, which is over saturated with both good and bad photography, the biggest challenge is standing out from the crowd. Having original ideas and executing them to a high standard, targeting more difficult subjects or portraying common subjects in a new way.

simon roy roe deer in bluebellsQ. Tell us about one of your favourite images – how did it come about and what do you like about the photo?
My photograph of a young female Roe Deer (Capreolus capreolus) highlighted by the morning sun amongst spring bluebells. This was captured in May 2016 and is the result of a four-year project at a local woodland. It is not only one of my favourite images but also the most satisfying and was achieved through many hours of patience and perseverance. I love every part of this scene from the eye contact with the beautiful doe to the bright blur of bluebells and the trees beyond.

Q. What, if any, specialist equipment do you use?
I use Canon cameras and have both full frame and crop sensor bodies. I have the Canon EF 500mm f/4L IS II USM lens, which is an amazing piece of kit. My gear is mounted to a Gitzo GT3542LS Series 3 tripod with gimbal and ball heads.

I would love to visit the Canadian wilderness

Q. Do you manipulate your images post-shoot?
Because of my graphical background I’m a big fan of Photoshop and feel it is an important tool for the digital photographer. Having said that I do believe you should try and make the best image possible in camera and only use PS to enhance good shots and not to fix bad ones! Typical post-production would be five to ten minutes, with adjustments to sharpness, levels and a bit of work with the dodge tool. I also only make tiny crops to my photographs and try to maintain the original aspect ratio.

Q. Is there anything, e.g. events, people or locations that you would particularly love to photograph?
I would love to visit Finland to photographs Brown Bears and the wildlife of the Canadian wilderness. There are still many locations in the UK on my wish list.

Q. What is your ultimate ambition as a photographer?
To become one of the most renowned British wildlife photographers.

All images © Simon Roy – for more info visit simonroyphotography.co.uk

To see a gallery of the work of Simon Roy, click on the images below

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